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KB'S TOOLS AND REPAIR

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ROCKWELL / BEAVER DRILL PRESS

THE

 ROCKWELL / BEAVER

14″ DRILL PRESS

The rebuild of this floor model drill press was started some time ago, and unfortunately no pictures were taken prior to dis-assembly. I purchased it because of the physical size and the name plate. I like the base size and thought the table had adequate surface dimensions. The drill press was completely dissembled, and the smaller parts were placed in ziplock bags, the base, table, yoke, and head castings were sandblasted. Prior to blasting the base, the main post which was seized in the base, had to be remove. I turned a plug with a step shoulder on the metal lathe, sizing it to the inside and outside diameters of the post. It was placed in the seized end of the post and a 2lb. hammer was used to drive the post free. A little heat from a torch was applied to the base to aid in the removal process. The post was sanded with 220 grit emery cloth, applying light force and oil which really brought out the shine. The castings were all painted using Industrial spray paint in a rattle can, and left for a week to dry, then reassembled.

REASSEMBLY OF THE DRILL PRESS

 

THE TABLE

One of the goals with this drill press was to see if the table could be squared up to the quill in the headstock. This drill press has a table that can be angled left and right, and a locate pin for setting the table to 45* and 90* to the quill. The question is, can the table be squared to the quill and are the locate holes accurate? The easiest way to square a drill press table is to use a indicator. If you are not sure how, hopefully this helps. If you own a magnetic base you will need to remove the main post which are usually threaded into the base. Set the main post in the chuck and snug it up, then add the main clamp, secondary rod and indicator. The indicator can be zeroed to the table surface.

INDICATING THE TABLE

Please note that a Craftsman Drill Press is used to show an example of how to set up the indicator. You can use a variety of setups to take the readings. The important thing is to sweep the table by turning the drill chuck and record the reading to determine if the table is square to the quill. If your table is movable, make your adjustments. You need to decide how close is good enough. Personally, I like to check everything with an indicator. It really dosn’t take that long and reduces the odds of missing the target. When I decided to rebuild this drill I suspected the table was not flat. The give away are the machining marks on the surface of the table. The surface was probably cut in one pass, which makes it cheaper to produce. There are many factors that affect the flatness of the surface. In this case, I suspect a cutter with a number of carbide inserts, larger then the table was used, which is good. What I don’t know is how many cycles are on the inserts, are the insert heights set correct, what was the feed rate, what is the condition of the machine doing the machining, and how much material is being removed in a pass. So I decided to check the table on the surface plate. The machined face of the table was set on the surface plate and using different thicknesses of feeler gauges, the clearances were checked. The clearance was .005″- .012″ primarily at the front corner. I coated the surface plate with Prussian Blue and the table with a background paste, to find the contact area. The table was only touching in a few areas indicating the table had a ton of variation in it. The next thing to check was the squareness of the table surface to the angled mounting surface. This needs to be 90* . In-order to check this a 1-2-3 block was bolted to the mounting face, and a indicator was used to check this angle.

FEELER GAUGES USED TO CHECK FOR CLEARANCE

CHECKING THE ANGLE

Notice the 1-2-3 block on the bottom of the setup. It is important that the top block is parallel to the surface plate for accurate measuring and this is one way to achieve that. As it turned out there was +.001 variation for a length of 3″traveling from the front to the back of the block, (.0003 / 1″). This tell us the table mounting face which has a length of 5″ is out of square to the table face by .0015″-.002″. That is pretty good at this stage. The concern is the overall flatness of the table. There is a .012 drop in the front corner which is a bit to much, so I decided to scape the table surface flat and square to the mounting face.

ROCKWELL / BEAVER DRILL PRESS – II

SCRAPING THE TABLE

The working face of the table was set onto the surface plate and it’s flatness was checked using different sizes of feeler gauges. There was no problem sliding .012 under one front corners of the table, and judging by the tooling marks, that is where the cutter started across the table. On average a .006 feeler could fit under most areas of the table. The surface plate was blued, and the table was checked for high spots. The picture indicated three major contact points. The table needed close to 30 passes to produce a decent pattern. The angle face was then scraped flat to the surface plate. I was not to concerned about the angle between the table work face and the angle mounting face when scraping both surfaces flat, primarily because of the lack of contact points that initially existed (this could produce false readings). The adaptor that connects the table to the mast was scraped flat to the surface plate. It is important to replicate the adaptor in a clamped state for an accurate picture during scraping. I inserted a 1/16 thick washer in the slot near the clamp lever and tightened the clamp, which should duplicate the adaptor being clamped on the mast. A sleeve the same diameter as the mast could be turned on a lathe and inserted into the adaptor to produce the same effect. When a suitable pattern was achieved, it was checked to the angled table mount. There was a decent amount of contact points showing between those two surfaces.

CHECKING FOR FLATNESS USING FEELERS

THE TABLE AND ADAPTOR AFTER SCRAPING

 

THE ANGLES

There are two angles that need to be checked. The table work face needed to be 90* to the table mounting face and secondly, the mounting face on the adaptor has to be parallel to the mast. I decided to check the table first. Once again the scraped work face is placed on the surface plate, and a 1-2-3 block was bolted to the angled face. The block needs to be checked left to right for parallelism to the surface plate. The surface gauge and indicator are slid along the length of the block and a reading is taken. Please note the picture used is from the initial check but the method is the same.

CHECKING FOR TAPER

There was a .0015 taper as the indicator was moved along the 3″ face, from the front to the back of the 1-2-3 block. This works out to .0005/inch and since the table is 12″ long, a .006 total taper exists to the mounting face. It really dosn’t matter which surface is re-scraped to correct the angle, but since the mounting face is smaller than the table working surface, less reworking will be needed. The mounting face has a length of 5″ , and at a taper of .0005/inch, .0025 worth of material has to be removed.

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